Terrestrial

Terrestrial habitats are ones that are found on land, like forests, grasslands, deserts, shorelines, and wetlands. Terrestrial habitats also include man made habitats, like farms, towns, and cities, and habitats that are under the earth, like caves and mines. The kinds of plants that grow in a terrestrial habitat, and the kinds of animals that can live there, are most influenced by the amount of moisture that is in the soil or that comes down as rain or snow, how cold the area can be during winter, how many nutrients are available in the soil, and whether or not the land is flooded with water.

 
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BioKIDS is sponsored in part by the Interagency Education Research Initiative. It is a partnership of the University of Michigan School of Education, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, and the Detroit Public Schools. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DRL-0628151.
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